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Ash Meadows NWR

Ash Meadows NWR

It Is All About the Pupfish, Do You Remember the Brouhaha, and Rightly So, Over the Pupfish

Geologic Faults Forcing Fossil Water Up Into the Amargosa Valley Desert As Seeps and Springs Resulting In An Oasis In the Mojave Desert. Ancient Pupfish Living In Those Seeps and Springs

The Devil’s Hole Pupfish, the Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish, the Warm Springs Pupfish, and the Ash Meadows Speckled Dace Are All Endangered and All Inhabit Springs, Holes and Streams In Death Valley NP and Ash Meadows NWR.

Back In the Day, the Sixties, These Fish and Conservation Activists Championing Them, Brought Farming, Development and Ground Water Pumping In the Midst of the Mojave Desert In the Amargosa Valley To a Court Ordered Halt, Resulting In the Establishment of the Ash Meadows NWR.

It Is All About the Water, Fossil Water, and the Geology.

“Water is the key natural resource that makes Ash Meadows a unique ecosystem in the dry Mojave Desert. Where does it come from? Over 100 miles to the northeast water enters a vast underground aquifer system. This water, also known as fossil water, takes thousands of years to move through the ground. A geologic faultacts as an underground dam partially blocking the flow of water and forcing it to the surface into over 50 seeps and springs. Over 10,000 gallons per minute flow year round, most of which come from seven major springs.”

“Ash Meadows has the greatest concentration of endemic life in the United States and second greatest in all of North America.

At least 26  endemic species have adapted to live in and around the waters of Ash Meadows”

August 2016 US Fish and Wildlife Service Publication Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

16 Dec 2017

Bosque del Apache NWR 12-2017 ~ Day 3 AM

Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

San Antonio, New Mexico

12-4 2017

Morning Shoot Day Three

Northern Shoveler

A Nod and Kudos to Jeff Parker and Mary O of Explore In Focus for once again going above and beyond.

Contact these folks for quality photography tours.

~ / ~ / ~

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR 2017

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del ApacheBosque del Apache NWR 2016

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bitter Lake NWR ~ Lesser Sandhill Cranes

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Aransas NWR ~ Whooping Cranes

12 Dec 2017

Bosque del Apache NWR 12-2017 ~ Day 2 PM

Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

San Antonio, New Mexico

12-3 2017

Afternoon/Evening Shoot Day Two

A Nod and Kudos to Jeff Parker and Mary O of Explore In Focus for once again going above and beyond.

Contact these folks for quality photography tours.

~ / ~ / ~

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR 2017

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del ApacheBosque del Apache NWR 2016

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bitter Lake NWR ~ Lesser Sandhill Cranes

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Aransas NWR ~ Whooping Cranes

12 Dec 2017

Bosque del Apache NWR 12-2017 ~ Day 2 AM

Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

San Antonio, New Mexico

12-3 2017

Morning Shoot Day Two

Morning Activity ~ Crane Pools

Morning Light On Sandhill Cranes Leaving the Roost To Feed Last of the Sandhill Cranes Leaving the Roost Gambel’s Quail Looking For Sky Grain 😉

A Nod and Kudos to Jeff Parker and Mary O of Explore In Focus for once again going above and beyond.

Contact these folks for quality photography tours.

~ / ~ / ~

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR 2017

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del ApacheBosque del Apache NWR 2016

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bitter Lake NWR ~ Lesser Sandhill Cranes

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Aransas NWR ~ Whooping Cranes

11 Dec 2017

Bosque del Apache NWR 12-2017 ~ Day 1

Bosque del Apache NWR

12-2 2017

A Special Place, A Special PresenceNew Equipment Learning Curve

In the End Resulting In Some Nice Flight Sequences & Flight Captures Long Tall Drink of Water Morning Light Before Morning Light Gambel’s Quail ~ Male & Female

A Nod and Kudos to Jeff Parker and Mary O of Explore In Focus for once again going above and beyond.

Contact these folks for quality photography tours.

~ / ~ / ~

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR 2017

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del ApacheBosque del Apache NWR 2016

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bitter Lake NWR ~ Lesser Sandhill Cranes

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Aransas NWR ~ Whooping Cranes

11 Dec 2017

Bosque del Apache NWR 12-2017 ~ Day 1 / Blind

Bosque del Apache NWR

12-3 2017

A Special Place, A Special Presence

 Images from a two-person blind at the Bosque Bird Watchers RV Park just outside of the Refuge.

European Starlings ~ Non-Native Invasive Species

Blame It On Shakespeare Scrub Jay Ground Squirrel Gambel’s Quail ~ Female Gambel’s Quail ~ Male Whoops ~ Red-Winged Blackbird, Female ~ Who Knew (Jeff Parker)

A Nod and Kudos to Jeff Parker and Mary O of Explore In Focus for once again going above and beyond.

Contact these folks for quality photography tours.

~ / ~ / ~

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR 2017

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR 2016

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bosque del Apache NWR

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bitter Lake NWR ~ Lesser Sandhill Cranes

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Aransas NWR ~ Whooping Cranes

11 Dec 2017

la Mesilla, New Mexico

la Mesilla, New Mexico

Grab shots after lunch at Andeles Dog House in Mesilla, New Mexico.

Lucky finds all around.

Basilica de San Albino on the Plaza Classy Antique Truck on the Grounds of St Clair Winery & Bistro Sweet

28 Nov 2017

White Sands National Monument

White Sands National Monument

Thank You to Herbert Hoover and the Antiquities Act

Gotta Go Out of One’s Way To Get Here

Tough Place to Capture Images

I Will Forever View Images of White Sands National Monument With Awe and Humility

Tons of Recent Visitation

Had to Walk Forever to Find Fresh Untrammeled Sand

28 Nov 2017

Bitter Lake NWR ~ Lesser Sandhill Cranes

Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Southeastern New Mexico ~ Outside of Roswell

Wintering Grounds and/or Stopover For Lesser Sandhill Cranes

Raptor Flyover ~ Morning

Not to be Overlooked ~ Snow Geese

Lesser Sandhill Cranes Returning to Roost

These guys (compared to the Great Sandhill Cranes) breed at more northern latitudes such as the arctic, are smaller and the smallest, weighing on average about 6-7 pounds and standing 3-3.5 feet tall.

The Bitter Lake Lesser Sandhills migrate as far as Western Alaska & Siberia.

Kudos to Steve Alvarez and Staff, Jim Montgomery and the Friends of Bitter Lake NWR for a well done educational and experiential outreach ~ Cranes & Cocoa 2017

Nice Community

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Bitter Lake NWR

 December 2011 ~ Bitter Lake NWR Blog Post Link

 

26 Nov 2017

Wichita Mountains NWR ~ Oklahoma

Wichita Mountains NWR

Southwestern Oklahoma outside of Lawton & Cache

Do not miss the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton, Oklahoma ~ Exceptional

We will return to the Refuge and the Museum

Home to Big Mammals : Bison, Elk & Longhorn CattleAn unfortunate fence between the restricted area and the public access area.

By the road for most of the way.Morning hunt over the prairie dog town.Prairie Dogs being social !?!

Expanded Image Gallery Link

23 Nov 2017

Crab Eyes ~ Wichita Mountains NWR

Crab Eyes

Wichita Mountains NWR ~ Southwestern Oklahoma

Day hike into the Charons Graden Wilderness Area

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Crab Eyes Trail Slide Show

23 Nov 2017

Jefferson, Texas

Jefferson, Texas

Grab Shots of An Interesting Texas Town, A Town With Some History

18 Nov 2017

Caddo Lake ~ Flight

Caddo Lake

Flight Sequences

Northeast Texas on the Texas~Louisiana Border

Once Again, Gotta Have a Boat or Access To Be On the Water

Contact Paul Keith ~ Nice Guy With a Bass Boat and Knowledge of the Lake : 
318-455-3437
~ caddoguide1@att.net

… going the other way. Caddo Lake Expanded Image Gallery Link

18 Nov 2017

Caddo Lake ~ Swampscapes

Caddo Lake

Northeast Texas on the Texas~Louisiana Border

Gotta Have a Boat or Access To Be On the Water

Contact Paul Keith ~ Nice Guy With a Bass Boat and Photographer’s Knowledge of the Lake : 
318-455-3437
~ caddoguide1@att.net

Beautiful Even On a Cloudy Overcast Morning Sans Sunrise

Back In the Day Telephone Poles to the Other Side Government Ditch ~ Civil War Era Caddo Lake Expanded Image Gallery Link

 

18 Nov 2017

Seal Cove (Maine) Auto Museum

Seal Cove (Maine) Auto Museum

Who knew?

A collection of fine classic, vintage and antique automobiles, well displayed and creatively interpreted.

Did I mention brass!!

Well worth the journey.

Image Gallery Slide Show Link

14 Nov 2017

Ile Grand Manan ~ August, 2017

Ile Grand Manan ~ August, 2017

Ile Grand Manan ~ August, 2017

Link ~ Expanded Image Gallery ~ Ile Grand Manan,  August, 2017

Link ~ Expanded Image Gallery ~ Ile Grand Manan. June, 2017

Link ~ Expanded Image Gallery ~ Ile Grand Manan, New Brunswick, Canada, 2015

 

30 Aug 2017

Ile Grand Manan ~ 6-2017

Ile Grand Manan ~ June, 2017

In the photographic company of one Noel Chenier,

A photographic workshop/tour done well!!

Thank You Noel Chenier

Ile Grand Manan ~ NB ~ Canada ~ 2015 Photo-Blog Entry Link

Ile Grand Manan ~ 6-2017 ~ June 2017 Gallery Link

Whale Cove ~ Ile Grand Manan Morning Light From Swallowtail Light ~ Ile Grand Manan Perspectives On Swallowtail Light ~ Ile Grand Manan Mid-Day Moving Waters ~ Deep Cove ~ Ile Grand Manan North Harbor Wharf Reflection ~ Ile Grand Manan Evening Moving Waters ~ Dark Harbor ~ Ile Grand Manan Macro Starburst ~ Deep Cove ~ Ile Grand Manan

Ile Grand Manan ~ June, 2017

In the photographic company of one Noel Chenier,

A photographic workshop/tour done well!!

Thank You Noel Chenier

Ile Grand Manan ~ NB ~ Canada ~ 2015 Photo-Blog Entry Link

Ile Grand Manan ~ 6-2017 ~ June 2017 Gallery Link

3 Jul 2017

Churches of Edisto Island, South Carolina

Churches of Edisto Island

Edisto Island, South Carolina

While on the road the Winter of 2017 we spent some time in March on Edisto Island; enough time to find and photograph some unique people, places and structures.

One morning’s trek back up SC 174 to photograph a couple of eye-catching church buildings grew to several days, several places and several kind South Carolinians who extended themselves to me.

A tip of the hat and a thank you to :

Librarian Marilyn Bowman of the Charleston County Public Library on Edisto, Island,

the Rector Weyman Camp of the Trinity Episcopal Church,

and Craig Williams congregant of the Presbyterian Church on Edisto Island

These folks proved to be exceptionally gracious, welcoming and informative, local Edistonians at their finest, proud South Carolinians all.

Trinity Episcopal ChurchFounded in 1774, the present church (the third church building), consecrated in 1881, stands on the sight of the old sanctuary.

The church was occupied by Federal troops during the Civil War, destroyed by fire in 1876 and damaged by the hurricane of 1893.

The sanctuary was rebuilt and features beautiful interior work done by a former slave.

The old bead-board and blown glass windows have been lovingly preserved.The Trinity Episcopal (now Anglican) Church graciously provides a building’s worth of space for the Charleston County Public Library on Edisto Island.

The Library has wonderful staff and a wonderful presence.

New Englanders (Yankees) are wont to judge towns by their Town Library.

Edisto gets high library marks and high book store marks.

Down the road a-piece stands the two buildings of New First Missionary Baptist Church.

The new sanctuary and community building  and beyond it the historic sanctuary of the New First Missionary Baptist Church.

This Church was founded and built in 1818 by the wife of an Edisto plantation owner, Hephzibah Jenkins Townsend.

Many slaves worshipped here, and after the Civil War it was turned over to the African-American congregation.

Descendants of 19th century members continue to worship today in the New First Baptist Missionary Church next door.

The historical sanctuary now houses the congregation of The Episcopal Church On Edisto.A theological dispute that became a political and legal dispute at the Diocese level resulted in a segment of the Trinity Episcopal Church (now Anglican) congregation and leadership leaving and becoming the The Episcopal Church On Edisto.

“Our brother in Christ, the Rev. Albert C. (Chick) Morrison, has offered our
continuing worship community the use of the historic sanctuary of the New First
Missionary Baptist Church for our worship services on an ongoing basis.  We are
very blessed by the generosity of this very kind Christian man and his
congregation.”

The Episcopal Church On Edisto

The Zion Reformed Episcopal Church, “the Episcopal Church of Color”.The Zion Reformed Episcopal Church was founded after the Civil War by African-American members of the Trinity Episcopal Church who were unwilling to be restricted to sitting in the upstairs galleries of Trinity Episcopal Church.

Presbyterians settled Edisto Island and their Church buildings and Church property attest to that fact.

A Presbyterian congregation was meeting on Edisto Island possibly as early as 1689.

The original building was erected in 1710, which later burned and was replaced in 1807.

The present church was constructed under the supervision of E.M. Curtis, a Charleston builder and completed 1836.

The beautiful Classic Greek Revival architecture reflects the prosperity of the Edisto planters and served both the white and black islanders until the beginning of the Civil War in 1861.

It has a large graveyard with many fine gravestones dating from 1792.

A large balcony with exterior entrances was built for  slaves.

The church interior has been beautifully restored, today, to include its original high pulpit .

Researcher Agnes L. Baldwin wrote that the earliest settlers on Edisto Island were Welsh and Scottish immigrants, and that Rev. Archibald Stobo “had begun preaching on Edisto in 1722 and that (the church) had been established by at least 1710.”

She continues, interestingly, “at first the Presbyterian worshippers shared their building with the Baptists, and relied on circuit riders for their pastors, but by 1722, they alone were using the church.”

Historically, Anglican and Presbyterian churches made earnest efforts, Baldwin writes, but could not compete with Baptists and Methodists in attracting Black churchgoers. The Allen AME Church, The Old First Baptist Church and many other smaller churches on Edisto, today, are historic and teaming with churchgoers every Sunday. Many drive long distances to attend.

… There is a Presbyterian Church that is black, now, down the road. The Rev. McKinley Washington, pastor of Edisto Presbyterian Church, is in his 70’s. He served for 27 years as a legislator, first in the House, then the Senate. In 1964, he organized a branch of the NAACP and led a successful voter registration drive. Today, the beautiful bridge that leads to Edisto Island is named for him, and he gathers, still, a loyal congregation.

(The Reverend McKinley Washington retired May of 2012.)

Interviewed in 2007, Washington said that his church started shortly after the Civil War in the same way many black churches began. “Blacks worshiping in the balcony of the white church, The Presbyterian Church on Edisto Island, just up S.C. Highway 174, were asked to leave — during a service, the story goes. They finished their worship that day in the shade of an old oak tree.”

Their first church structure was assembled with material from Palmetto trees. Eventually, a tiny church building was uprooted from Edingsville Beach, floated up the river to Murray’s Landing, then set in place at Cypress Bottom Road and Highway 174, Washington said. In 1968, the current brick structure with its huge Presbyterian cross was erected. It’s name is Edisto Island Presbyterian Church.

The Manse of the Presbyterian Church On Edisto

The two-and-a-half story manse is thought to have been built for the Church’s minister around 1790.

The land for the manse was donated to the Church by Henry Bowers in 1717.

Though updated with modern conveniences, modifications to the Presbyterian Manse have been few over time, and the house remains virtually the same in appearance as when it was built.

It is the oldest structure on the island associated with a church.

Botany Bay Road beyond the Allen AME Church The Allen AME Church across the salt marsh down the Botany Bay Road.

Home of the community-wide food bank.

I am hoping I have been fair and just to all in my written comments.

Expanded Image Gallery ~ Churches of Edisto Island

26 Mar 2017

The Manse ~ Edisto Island, South Carolina

Presbyterian Manse of Edisto

Edisto Island, South Carolina

A Special Thanks To Mr. Craig Williams

of

The Presbyterian Church On Edisto Island

The stately home facing Store Creek on Edisto Island, SC has served as the manse for the Presbyterian Church On Edisto Island since the late 18th century.

The Church houses one of the oldest Presbyterian congregations in the nation dating to the late 17th century;

it was founded shortly after Royal Governor Joseph Morton settled on the island in 1680.

The two-and-a-half story manse is thought to have been built for the Church’s minister around 1790.

The land for the manse was donated to the Church by Henry Bowers in 1717.

While many might see this elegant home as more imposing than one would expect for a church manse, it is actually quite austere.

Its only ornamentation is the four-pane transom over the entrance; all other features are purely functional.

The house stands on a raised basement, not only affording spectacular views of the creek but also allowing the home to be cooled by breezes coming off the water.

The interior consists of four rooms on each floor, which are divided symmetrically by a central hallway.

The balance of windows also contributed to the movement of salty air through the house, serving as a natural air conditioner.

Though updated with modern conveniences, modifications to the Presbyterian Manse have been few over time, and the house remains virtually the same in appearance as when it was built.

It is the oldest structure on the island associated with a church.

The Presbyterian Manse is listed in The National Register.

Text Courtesy of SC Picture Project

23 Mar 2017

Charleston, South Carolina

Charleston, SC

On Tour With Joyce Weir

Charleston History Tours ~ Picture Perfect Walks

A Great Mix of Charleston History and Image Subject, Composition Prompts and Advice

Wonderful

Circular Church CongregationalWashington Square

After a History of Fires All Homes Had To Be Constructed of Brick – Note Clapboarding Over Brick

Note the Absence of HVAC and Telephone Wires, Cables and PolesSt Michael’s Episcopal Church

Wedding Cake HouseOutdoor Privy From Back In the DayPreserved Row HomesIron Work and Intricately Pointed Brick WorkDecorative Hurricane Bolts Preserved Row Homes Formal Garden

Brick Alley – Note Stucco Over Brick Towards Rainbow RowCalhoun’s BankCobbles & Thigh Roof Tiles ~ Oldest Structure In Charleston ~ 1712Dock Street Theater & St. Phillips Church ~ 1809 & 1835

Slight Tilt Due To EarthquakeWell Done Joyce Weir – Charleston History Tours ~ Picture Perfect Walks

Well Done Charleston, South Carolina

~~~

The southern cities of New Orleans (Louisianan), Savannah (Georgia) and Charleston (South Carolina) all have similarities and individuality.

NOLA is and was an outpost of the French and Spanish empires in North America, more a Carribean place than an American place. Slavery and cotton. The city and it’s peoples keep getting up off the hurricane and flooding mat and partying on. Safe but still the bottom rung on the seedy scale (which is not a bad thing in my book). Wonderful streets and architecture in and around the city. Jackson Square abounds with art and energy: lots of street people and street energy, a melange of people moving at all hours. Culture and peoples are palpable in NOLA. Well done: live music, accessible music, jazz music.

Savannah dodged a bullet back in the day thanks to Sherman’s desire, after burning much of the of the South, to gift the preserved city to President Lincoln. Slavery and the black freedman are present. Love the city squares lay out, the omnipresent live oaks and color, SCAD and the presence of youth, the city’s accessibility and pride. Oglethorpe was the man. Again with a distinctive architecture and a preservationist presence, photographic opportunities abound. These folks party too just not as often nor as hard as the denizens of NOLA. Savannah owns the middle ground on the seediness scale. River Street needs way fewer tacky tourist sales traps; but oh the pralines at both ends of the walk.

Charleston, a walled city back in the day, fewer squares and fewer live oaks, early on preserved itself for the future. History is palpable in Charleston: fires, earthquakes, hurricanes, a busy seaport and the cultivation of rice, cotton, and indigo. slavery, slave insurrections and wars. You want haughty property values, than Charleston, SC is your place. Oozing with preserved history, so much so that some of the old homes still have entry way boot scrapers. All cynicism aside Charleston is the epitome of the historical southern city. Charleston was slow to recover from the devastation of the Civil War. Its pace of recovery became the foundation of the City’s greatest asset – its vast inventory of historically significant architecture.  Other grand southern cities may, but Charleston does not appear on the seedy scale.

NOLA, Savannah and Charleston. All grand southern cities, all distinct and unique individual peoples and places.

20 Mar 2017